Running errand on a windy day

In late September, Bugman and I did a 19-mile training run during which I did not want to mess with carrying water bottles. I planted a full water bottle in a ditch along a dirt road on our planned route. We drank the water on our run and left the bottle in the ditch, intending to fetch it later.

We got busy.

The bottle never got picked up.

It’s been nagging at me intermittently ever since.

Today, I wanted to get in 10-11 miles. The water bottle locale is about 5 miles from my house, so I decided to run out and retrieve the bottle.

I wasn’t really looking forward to the run. The remaining leaves were flying off the trees horizontally. At the time I left the house, winds were sustained at 20-30 miles per hour, gusting to 40 (the peak gust at the airport was 62 mph), making the 47-degree temps feel like 38. It was made extra uncomfortable by the low relative humidity, around 16 percent. I can’t inhale through my nose when facing into a dry wind like that. It just burns. And the skin on my hands is now dry and cracked.

But such is running.

If this were race day, I’d just have to run through it, so run through it I did.

A few photos from the run:

Despite the wind, there was not a lot of dust blowing, thanks to good precipitation this fall, and agricultural practices like furrowing perpendicular to the prevailing winds. These rows run southwest - northeast. The wind was coming from the northwest.

Despite the wind, there was not a lot of dust blowing, thanks to good precipitation this fall, and agricultural practices like furrowing perpendicular to the prevailing winds. These rows run southwest – northeast. The wind was coming from the northwest.

Sugar beet harvest equipment, idle in a field.

Sugar beet harvest equipment, idle in a field.

Brown earth, and Scotts Bluff National Monument about 7 miles to the southeast as the crow flies.

Brown earth, blue sky, and Scotts Bluff National Monument in the distance, about 7 miles as the crow flies.

Meanwhile, at Scotts Bluff National Monument, Summit Road was completely blocked by piles of windblown tumbleweeds. Photo from Scotts Bluff National Monument Facebook page.

Meanwhile, at Scotts Bluff National Monument, Summit Road was completely blocked by piles of windblown tumbleweeds. Photo from Scotts Bluff National Monument Facebook page. (Blaaah! Tumbleweeds!)

Aha! The object of my mission, next to a red plastic cup! Kind of surprised it was still there, but kind of not. There were lots of other beverage containers out there in the ditches. Beer cans and bottles, mostly. I suspect underage people drive on the gravel roads outside of town at night, drinking and ditching the evidence. *sigh*

Aha! The object of my mission, nearly buried in tumbleweeds next to a red plastic cup! Kind of surprised it was still there, but kind of not. There were lots of other beverage containers out there in the borrow pits along the gravel roads north of town. Beer cans and bottles, mostly. *sigh*

Another 11.5 miles logged. I feel amazed and grateful that I can just go out and crank out that kind of distance and not get completely wiped out by it. (I was “only” at an 11:57 average pace, but that’s pretty darned good for me, especially considering the wind!)

Copyright 2013 by Katie Bradshaw

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s