2016 Cycle Greater Yellowstone Day 2: Livingston to Bozeman

Day 2 of Cycle Greater Yellowstone backtracked us back to Beall Park in Bozeman again. The full route included a 50-mile out-and-back down Paradise Valley, but, given that there was no rest day this year, our training was minimal, we had already ridden Paradise Valley in 2013, and the day was supposed to be hot, we opted for the shorter route of 35 miles of mostly hills back to Bozeman, which Jennifer Drinkwalter had described the day before as “up, down, up, down, up, up, down.” Not quite, but, still – hills. All uphill for pretty much the first 14 miles.

I started out the morning in a bad mood. I hadn’t slept well – for the third night in a row. We couldn’t buy a replacement water bottle for the hot day ahead, as the mechanics were sold out and the CGY help desk couldn’t help. We got on our bike and found it had a new, loud ticking sound that wasn’t there the day before. What the heck? Maybe our bike had fallen over in the wind the day before after we’d parked it (against a tennis court net, which offense apparently had enraged the local tennis court boosters – oops).

Yeah, I had a case of the Mondays on vacation. I was feeling junky.

1 junky

Thank goodness there was another rider – Ken from Illinois – who was babying a sore knee and “going slow” (AKA “our pace”) who rode with us and kept us distracted from the hill with conversation. That really helped! (Thanks, Ken!)

Here’s us with Ken at the first water stop on the 35-mile route, at Montana Grizzly Encounter.

2 bear encounter stop

The Grizzly Encounter place was a total surprise to me – I hadn’t been aware there was anything special. We all got to go inside to see the bears, which had been rescued from some unfortunate situation or another and couldn’t make it in the wild.

A wall of the compound made a good bike parking surface.

3 bike parking

Me and Dixie Hooper (a super enthusiastic gal I met last year as part of the CGY ambassador program) and a new friend. (Photo by Dixie’s beau, Andrew.)

4 me & Dixie

First things first: what to do if you encounter a bear at close quarters:

5 bear tips

Bugman watching the two bears out in the display yard that morning.

6 jeff and bear

A wee tiff?

7 bear fight

Back out on the road again (with our sun sleeves freshly wetted down – ahhhh, so cool!), we passed the quaint, octagonal Malmborg School.

8 malmborg school

Downhill. Wheeee!

9 downhill

Whoa. That’s a heckuva snowplow!

10 heckuva snowplow

My view from the back of the tandem. Not bad!

11 my view

Our next rest stop was at Lower Bridger School, which we had ridden past in 2013. We even got to go inside!

12 lower bridger canyon school

Next, we headed up Kelly Canyon Road. And I mean *up*. I have two words for that short-but-wicked ascent: UFF and DA. I got no pictures of us walking our tandem up the last yards to the summit – too demoralizing. It was simply too steep for us to continue pedaling and stay upright. We met some local cyclists up there, including a couple on a tandem. They commiserated with the steepness of the climb, noting that the grade was 18% at some point. Eighteen percent! Egads! No wonder we had to walk.

The coast down the other side was quite nice.

Closer into town, we got stopped by a train. Made me think of my dad.

13 stopped by a train

Somewhere after crossing this train track as we approached Bozeman, traffic got hairy. No honkers, but plenty of risky passing. Made me nervous! Also, we managed to roll into Bozeman during the traffic-y lunch hour. Not very fun. We wound up dismounting and walking our tandem across one particularly busy intersection. It’s just too hard to get started quickly when a traffic opening briefly appears.

Earlier that morning, as the Tent Sherpa crew was packing up the tent city while I prepared for our leisurely 8am start on this “short route” day, I had asked the crew if they might consider reorienting the layout for double-occupancy tents to allow access to both tent doors. In previous years we’d been able to use both tent doors and vestibules for access and gear storage, but this year, the tents had been set up so close together that we couldn’t use the back door or vestibule. When we rolled into camp in Bozeman, we found this:

14 camp back in bozeman

Yup – that’s our tent, on the end, with both doors accessible. There would be some similar accommodation for the rest of the double tents for the rest of the trip. Awesome crew!!

Our bag lunches were waiting for us in camp. For once, I was able to get into the shower without waiting in line. We took the opportunity to do laundry while there was no waiting as well. (So THIS is what it feels like to be a speedy person and get into camp early!) We were able to buy a new water bottle from the mechanics’ restocked supply, too.

Then, we wandered the shops of downtown Bozeman for a bit. (Well, I shopped, Bugman tagged along and checked work emails on his phone.) I mostly bought gifts, but I did buy two things for myself: a Halloween dishtowel with a cycling skeleton, and a book of poster art of National Parks done in the style of the old New Deal/WPA posters.

IMG_9816

As Bugman and I were headed back to camp, a young man on a bicycle hopped a curb towards us. As he did so, something fell from his bike, which he then ran over. He skidded to a stop next to us. “Dammit!” he said, looking back at what I now realized was a torn-open can of beer. “I biked six miles with that beer!”

I sympathized with the guy, but Bugman and I also got a good chuckle. #hipsterproblems

When we hiked back up to long-term parking in the fairgrounds parking lot to offload our purchases, we could smell smoke and could see a plume rising to the north. Uh oh.

15 grass fire

During announcements, Jennifer noted that the crew was keeping an eye on a grass fire near our morning route. That evening, flakes of ash fell on us in camp. Luckily, the fire was extinguished by nightfall, and the wind that came up in the night didn’t appear to restoke it.

Day 2 stats
36.7 miles
2,360 feet of climb
10.6 mph avg speed
low temp 47
hi temp 92
precip 0
wind 8-22 g 30 NE

Copyright 2016 by Katie Bradshaw

2016 Cycle Greater Yellowstone Day 1: Bozeman to Livingston

Ah, the first day of Cycle Greater Yellowstone, when all is fresh and new! I tend to take a lot of photos on day 1. This year was no exception. There are 50 photos in this post!

Here’s the only picture we got of us together. (Another photo we attempted at the top of a hill did not turn out – alas!)

1 headed out

Our Thing-1-Thing-2 getup attracted the attention of a TV reporter, and we wound up on the evening news. (Another rider dubbed us “The Things” and would greet us on the route, “Hey, Things!”)

The official start line! (With the TV reporter off to the side.)

2 start line

A grain elevator with a ghost sign. “IT’S THE WHEAT FLOUR . . . A PERFECT PRODUCT”

3 grain elevator

I did a double-take on this one. CaLfe? I looked it up. Stockyard Cafe. I get it! Calf-cafe. Ha!! To quote from their website: “This is recreational restauranting…. Stockyard Cafe…barely above camping :)”

4 stockyard calfe

The early morning light made the scenery glow. (Since we’re slow, we always try to be on the road when the course opens at 7am.

5 morning light

A high fire danger day. We were impacted by a bit of wildfire smoke on one day, and the organizers were keeping an eye on a grassfire near the route, but otherwise, we lucked out this year and avoided wildfire conflicts. I suspect wildfire season is part of the reason CGY organizers are thinking about moving the date into September next year.

6 fire danger

Bridger Canyon is lovely!

7 bridger canyon

I had to manipulate the photo settings to get the colors to show up – wonder if anyone else noticed the iridescent clouds that morning.

8 rainbow cloud.jpg

Hay bale art: a bonny Scottish coo? (Would explain the hair-over-the-eye look.)

9 bale buddy

I was loving the scenery!

10 more bridger canyon

But some drivers weren’t loving the bikes on the road. We encountered the first of the week’s honking drivers along this road.

I don’t know if it was the route, or if people’s behavior is changing, but there seemed to be a lot of rude and impatient drivers this year. I have a hypothesis that the increased speed limits on interstates and rural highways have made drivers more accustomed to higher speeds and more likely to get impatient if they have to slow down. Whatever the cause, I don’t like it. Not one bit.

This cow was offended by the rude honking, too:

11 shocked cow

We saw a lot of magpies along the route all week. You can just make one out in this photo, sitting on a fencepost.

12 magpie and mountain

Tandem shadow! On this section of route, we were passed by a number of vintage cars. Not all of them passed carefully. Some were so eager to pass the bicycles that they risked head-on collisions with oncoming traffic. You would think people driving classic cars would be a little more careful.

13 tandem shadow

Before it landed on the ranch gate, this raven flew behind us for several hundred yards. I watched it follow us in my rear view mirror. Corvids are pretty intelligent birds. I wonder what it was thinking.

14 raven ranch gate

Being slower on the uphill on a tandem, we got passed a lot on the first part of the ride.

15 being passed

A rest STOP.

16 stop

The uphill climb continues, we get passed some more.

17 passed again

My view from the back of the tandem. Not bad.

18 my view

Passed again!

19 passed again

At last – Battleridge Pass (elevation 6,372 feet). Mostly done with the day’s climbing!

20 pass stop

Zooming along on the downhill, cyclists tend to take the lane. You need more room to maneuver at higher speeds.

21 passed again

A cattle corral, with bees. You can’t see the bees in the photo, but when we went by, there were a bunch of what appeared to be honeybees crossing the road. One cyclist got a bee caught in her sunglasses and got stung next to her eye. Ow!

22 corral

This is a working landscape here. Lots of alfalfa, like this side-roll-irrigated field.

23 side roll irrigation

Bikes weren’t the only slow-moving vehicles on this road. Watch for farm equipment, too!

32 watch for farm equipment

The rest stop at the Sedan School was fun. As soon as we arrived, we were mobbed by youngsters offering to fill our water bottles for us. ❤ We had our photo taken with a couple of girls. Our jerseys went well with their recent Dr. Seuss readings. 🙂

24 water bottle helpers

I think the folks at the rest stop were keen on introducing us to roping, but the roping dummies were too attractive as bike parking.

25 roping dummy bike parking

The dummies also made for great silly photo opportunities. 😀

26 roping dummy clowns

Then there was the slide . . .

27 giant slide

They sure don’t make ’em like that anymore! A few of us cyclists couldn’t resist a trip down that tall slide. It was high-diving-board intimidating at the top. The trick was being prepared for how it launched you forward at the end. I executed a rather ungraceful double-hop landing.

28 cannot resist

The source of our potable water at the water bar at the Sudan School stop: Black Magic!

29 black magic support truck

Everyone was exhorted to drink plenty of water and keep their water bottles filled. It was getting hot, and the air was dry. The SAG crew was sheltering in the shade of their van.

30 SAG crew

Gravel and a cattle guard on the turn into and out of the rest stop were a bad combo. Much easier to walk the tandem over the plywood.

31 rolling over cattle guard

The view west from the bridge over Flathead Creek.

33 meandering stream

A Historic Point, and a good excuse to pull over and rest, though we rarely did. Need to keep moving if you’re slower than most!

34 historic point

Did anyone see the elk? Haha.

35 elkhaha

When in Big Sky Country, don’t forget to look up.

36 big sky

We stopped for lunch at mile 47, at Clyde Park. I distinctly remember that lunch included gazpacho. It was divine. Cool, salty, cucumbery – the perfect meal on a hot day! The water bar was a popular place.

37 refill at water bar

Back on the road again. The road surface was unpleasantly gravelly in spots. I found this business sign amusing. “Have gravel will travel.”

38 have gravel will travel

We waved to a bikepacker family we met on the road. Mom was riding behind this dad and kid, waving her arm to try to slow traffic for safe passing. It didn’t work. Drivers flew past, taking risks I really wish they wouldn’t take.

39 bike packer family

As we turned west towards Livingston, the last 5 miles or so wound up being dab-on into a headwind. Not very fun at the end of a ride.

But we made it to Livingston! I love Sacagawea Park! It’s right on the Yellowstone River. I remembered it from the first year, but this time, we arrived in camp with plenty of time to get cleaned up and explore the downtown.

40 livinston tent city

There was a beautiful antique bus available to ferry us downtown. Downtown was only a couple of blocks away, though, so we walked. (Ah, that Day 1 energy!)

44 beautiful bus

Such an iconic historic-mountain-town view!

42 downtown livingston

Great vintage theater marquee!

41 livinston theater

We had to stop at a sandwich shop for some ice cream. The cone was stamped with a suggestion I followed: “EAT-IT-ALL”. Across the street was a bar advertising itself as a “husband day care center” while the wife shopped. Ha!

43 ice cream eat it all

My Überbrew pour that evening had a baristaesque touch: there was a heart in the foam!

45 i heart beer

After dinner, we retired to the banks of the Yellowstone River. I remember the river being higher and louder back in 2013. It had soothed me to sleep at the campsite that year, but this year I couldn’t hear it from the tents. Wonder if the channel shifted, or if the flow is low this year?

There was a family of osprey screaming around in the trees on the opposite bank. When I looked closer at a photo I managed to grab, I could see that the bird was carrying a fish!

46 osprey

I was having great fun playing with the colorful river rocks. (With thoughts of Andy Goldsworthy – one of my favorite artists. I am certainly no Andy Goldsworthy.)

47 colorful rocks

48 shades of grey

Alas, we broke one of our water bottles after dropping it on the rocks. Bummer! We’d need it the next day, which was predicted to be another hot one.

The sunset on the river was breathtakingly beautiful.

49 sunset phase 1

It kept getting better. I saw several people in camp rush to the riverbank with their cameras.

50 sunset phase 2

What a day! Can the first day be my favorite?

Day 1 stats
68.3 miles
2,501 feet of climb
12.5 mph avg speed
low temp 48
hi temp 88
precip 0
wind 5-16 g 22 east

Copyright 2016 by Katie Bradshaw

Cycle Greater Yellowstone: Day 2 ride to Livingston

Day 1

Distance and elevation gain (per my mapping software): 116 miles, 4,209 feet

Min temp: 48, Max temp: 91, Winds 5-15, gusting to 21, Precipitation: none

Because of the day’s long ride, the route opened at 6am instead of 7. We tried to hit the road at 6, but with the lines at breakfast and at the bike pump station, and with having to rendezvous with my camping gear angel at 5:30, we didn’t actually hit the road until 6:45, which was still before sunrise in the valley.

Sunrise. Dang! Wish my stinkin’ camera had focused properly!

About 7 miles into the morning ride, we encountered a hill.

A doozy of a hill.

Which meant a free ride on the other side, courtesy of gravity.

7 percent grade for the next 2 miles? Wheeeeeeeee!

For those who have not ridden a tandem bike before, one of the major differences is weight. Our two wheels were supporting close to 350 pounds. The thing handles like a semi truck. Anyone who has driven I-80 through Iowa will know the phenomenon of which I speak: slow on the uphill, FAST on the downhill. A tandem also has a turn radius similar to a semi. Not real manuverable in tight spaces.

Heading back on the road after a water stop.

Ranchers care for their land and animals

After a lunch stop in Sacajawea Park in Three Forks, we crossed the Madison River and biked on an I-90 frontage road.

At mile 60 at a four-way stop in Manhattan, Montana, we faced a choice: turn right, call it a day, and catch a bus to Livingston, or turn left and crank out another 56 miles. We chose the latter. (As I would later say to a fellow cyclist gasping up a hill, “Whoever said this was not a suffer fest lied.” The fellow cyclist replied, “We chose this.” True, true. Seemed like a good idea at the time . . . )

Where are we? Why, the Land of Magic, of course! (It’s a steakhouse. Go figure!)

There were tiny little schoolhouses in abundance in the Montana mountain valleys. Can’t see it in this pic, but the Dry Creek School had an outhouse out back.

Typical Montana scene: cattle grazing, a wheat field ready for harvest, mountains, a vast blue sky.

At around mile 74, we hit our first “uh-oh.”

We had stopped at a water stop, purported to be stocked with oh-so-welcome popsicles. The popsicles had run out, but the dear 4-H crew staffing the station had gone out to get more. I was getting a tad nervous about our timing – if the popsicles were gone, it meant we were likely some of the last riders out on the course. I’d been wondering, as we’d seen nary a rider since we left Manhattan. The folks said they would be closing up the stop in about 30 minutes. How close were we to the cutoff, after which riders would be removed from the course??

While we waited in the shade of an outbuilding for the popsicles, one of the kiddos at the station called out “someone’s tire’s hissing.”

Yay. It was our front tire. Our thorn-resistant inner tube had sprung a leak near the valve stem.

Luckily, we had a spare tube and pump.

Bugman sheltered in the shade of an electrical box to pump up the tire. I helped a little – ran my finger inside the tire to check for foreign objects and worked the pump for a little bit – but Bugman did the bulk of the work with that mini pump. Figures that just as we were rolling back out again the SAG truck, presumably containing a full-sized tire pump, rolled by. We did get our popsicles, by the way. Bomb-pop variety. My favorite!

It was really getting hot out. The water truck driver offered to hose down a few of our fellow riders as he packed up the truck to head to Livingston.

We wound up stopping at a “renegade” water stop, perhaps somewhere near mile 79? They were offering free ice but charging for water and Gatorade. Not sure what they were raising money for. We bought a couple of Gatorade bottles and chugged them on the spot. That may have been what saved us from the SAG wagon that day.

We made the time cutoff for the rest stop at Sore Elbow Forge on the northeast side of Bozeman by about 15-20 minutes. The Omnibar guy was already packing up his gear.

“Not good,” I was thinking. “But, we only have about 30 more miles to go. . . .  And a significant hill.”

Gulp!

Brain starting to go a little goofy from fatigue. I knew the “M” stood for Montana State, but I found it funny to voice in a Sesame-Street-like intonation: “M! Mountain! M!” So nice of them to help visitors by labeling the scenery!

Caught the tidily-painted outhouses behind the Bridger school in this photo.

Gosh! Beautiful scenery!

We stopped several times on the ascent up Jackson Creek Road to take a breather and drink water. A portajohn would have been most welcome at that point. When we finally crested the hill, the SAG wagon was there. They gave us a water refill and let us know it was only about 3 more miles to the rest stop at Malmborg School, and that it was mostly downhill. We had 20 minutes to get there before we were swept off the course.

Hurrah! We think we can make it!!

We cruised to the next water stop, hit the toilets, and snarfed down a bruised bananna – about all that was left at the rest stop. Apparently we missed a hockey team that had earlier made out like bandits selling snow cones.

I tottered out into the street to photograph the mileage marker:

One hundred miles! My first century ride!

Then course-manager-in-chief Jennifer Drinkwalter arrived on the scene. I knew her name from the numerous preparatory emails we’d gotten from her on the leadup to the ride. She was there to check on the ride stragglers, to judge if we were in any condition to safely complete the remaining 16 miles into camp.

“You’ve got about 5 minutes to get back on the road, guys,” she announced to the few cyclists left at the stop.

I noticed that when the SAG vehicle pulled up, there were several bikes on top. I think the heat really zapped a lot of people that day.

But Bugman and I are used to cycling in western Nebraska – we’re used to that kind of dry heat!

We wheeled back out into the road, assuring Jennifer that we were fit to continue….and then….

“Oh, no! Flat tire!!”

Yep. The front tire that we had replaced earlier that day had gone flat again.

Jennifer was a champ. She pointed out that the mechanic just across the parking lot could have us pumped up again and rolling in no time. She wouldn’t pull us off the course when we were so close.

The mechanic figured that our tube had gone flat from a puncture from one of the many goathead thorns we had embedded in our tires from back home. We didn’t have to worry about them before. The thorn-resistant inner tube had taken care of that. But with the wimpy regular inner tube, there was just enough thorn poking though to do some damage. The mechanic used a dental tool to pick out the thorns, installed a new tube, handed us a fresh tube, just in case, and $10 and 10 minutes later, we were headed out on the course again . . . officially the LAST cyclists on the course, with the SAG vehicles and an emergency radio vehicle on our tail pretty much the whole rest of the way.

There was one last little hill to conquer. Coming at the end of 100 miles of riding, in 90-degree temps during the latter part of the day, at 4,000+ feet above sea level, with a few other hills thrown in there for spice, that last uphill grade of 1 mile at 3 percent was just painful.

When we finally topped the hill, my fatigued brain read the “Absaroka Range” sign as “Assabroka Range.”

But at least after all that climbing, we were due for a downhill. Whew! We made pretty good time on those last 15 miles, I think.

Evidence of how rough the day was: Bugman’s black jersey was crusted white with perspiration salt. We were both pretty salty-crusty.

On the descent into Livingston I photographed this going-lenticular cloud, thinking it was interesting. That same cloud had been hovering on the horizon all day. Took me awhile to convince myself that it was not a thunderstorm but was actually wildfire smoke.

The scenery on approach to Livingston was mighty nice. Not sure it was worth all that climbing, though.

I am grateful to the course marshals who stayed out there to cheer and flag home us two flagging cyclists – the last ones to finish on our own power that day.

We parked our bike in the corral (a fenced-in tennis court), checked our wheel spokes because there has been some clicking noises and a bit of a wobble on the fast descents and found we had several loose spokes AGAIN, decided to deal with it in the morning, found our tent, dropped a few things, and went right to dinner. We weren’t the only crusty-jersey-clad cyclists in the meal line. I recognized a few other faces from the 116 mile route. The great part about being among fellow cyclists in a buffet food line instead of being among “civilians” is that the fellow bikers don’t take three steps back and try to breathe through their sleeves when standing in line behind you.

This was the only meal where the vegetarian option (artichoke and kidney bean paella on this day) was gone by the time I got there. All that was left were cooked carrots (ew) and unappetizing-looking blobs of chicken (ew). I ate some salad bar stuff and some white rice laced with Tabasco sauce. But it was all OK because there was ice cream with chocolate sauce for dessert.

I got the last of the chopped peanut topping.

Headed off to the shower and appreciated the cool, fluffy grass at our campsite in Livingston’s Sacagawea Park. We stayed up later than we wanted to so we could have a beer and catch a bit of the band in the Miles Park Bandshell. It was a fabulous campsite. Wish we’d had time to visit the downtown . . .

THIS was next to our campsite. Water burbling over rocks as I crashed to sleep . . . bliss . . .

Day 3

Copyright 2013 by Katie Bradshaw

Cycle Greater Yellowstone

How do I even begin to describe the experience that was the “first great ride in the last best place”?

Wowza!

This was my and Bugman’s first-ever cycle tour, which we completed on our tandem to celebrate our 15th wedding anniversary on August 22. We’ve got the date for the 2014 Cycle Greater Yellowstone blocked out on our calendar already. How’s that for an endorsement?

The gist: some 700 cyclists and about 100 support crew and volunteers in a week’s time circumnavigated the north borderlands of Yellowstone National Park in this inaugural bike ride (route to change in subsequent years). The point of the ride was not just to provide an unmatched cycling experience but also to introduce a new crowd of people to the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem and the issues the Greater Yellowstone Coalition (not to be confused with the Greater Yellowstone Coordinating Committee) is bringing to light, and to make connections with the communities surrounding the park.

The towns we stayed in or near are marked on this map: West Yellowstone, Ennis, Livingston, Gardiner, Cooke City, Cody, Red Lodge.

The towns we stayed in or near are marked on this map: West Yellowstone, Ennis, Livingston, Gardiner, Cooke City, Cody, Red Lodge.

I’ve gone deep into an Internet wormhole looking up information about the park and the ecosystem to include in this epic series of blog posts. I won’t come close to scratching the surface on the complexity of this region. I’ll try to touch on a few points here and there, but how’s this for a summary:

Yellowstone was established as the world’s first national park in 1872. The U.S. Army protected the park from poachers and other opportunists until 1917, when the park was transferred to the newly-created National Park Service.

From what I understand, the park boundaries were drawn up a bit arbitrarily, mostly with geologic considerations in mind. That creates some challenges when you start thinking in terms of functioning ecosystems, which, in the case of Yellowstone, has been estimated to encompass 20 million acres – not just the ~2 million acres in the park itself. The park’s iconic megafauna – the bison, elk, bears, and wolves that are the symbols of Yellowstone – rely on ecosystem webs that extend well outside the park boundaries. (And, in the case of climate change, which is affecting the whitebark pine and causing ripple effects throughout the system, the ecosystem webs extend well outside our nation’s boundaries.)

Arbitrary human boundaries create another complexity: jurisdiction. Within the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, the following governmental entities, at minimum, have authority: Department of the Interior National Park Service, Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management, Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of Agriculture Forest Service; administrations at two national parks, six national forests, and two national wildlife refuges; the states of Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho; and a large number of local jurisdictions (counties, towns, conservation districts, irrigation districts, etc.).

Which points to another issue facing the region: what is the highest and best use of this land in the Yellowstone region? You’ll get a different answer depending on which person or governmental agency you ask. Wildlife protection. Tourism development. Economic development. Vacation homes. Mining, Agriculture. Ranching. Energy extraction. Camping, Fishing. Hiking. Boating. Hunting. Snowmobiling. Horseback riding. Bike riding … the list goes on and on.

Thus, the need for a coalition of interested parties to come together, work together, and work through the tangle of competing interests.

Which brings me back to the bike ride designed to bring some more interested parties to the table . . .

I must say – this was a VERY well-organized ride.

Some people booked hotel rooms in communities along the way, but most people camped. Bugman and I used the “tent sherpa” service. It was very nice having our tent put up and taken down for us every day – especially on the days when it rained. This tour provided ALL meals through a catering service that is accustomed to feeding wildland firefighters. Between those hearty meals and the well-stocked rest stops, I think I probably GAINED weight while pedaling 380-plus miles including 10,000-feet-plus of climbing. Another definite plus: the shower trucks! Two semi trucks outfitted with individual shower stalls and on-demand hot water! True luxury!!! Other amenities included SAG vehicle support, on-course bike mechanics, gear transport service, and nightly live entertainment.

I’ll give a truncated day-by-day recounting of each day, with photos. Check it out under the following links:

Cycle Greater Yellowstone: Day 0 West Yellowstone

Cycle Greater Yellowstone: Day 1 ride to Ennis

Cycle Greater Yellowstone: Day 2 ride to Livingston

Cycle Greater Yellowstone: Day 3 ride to Gardiner

Cycle Greater Yellowstone: Day 4 bus tour of Yellowstone National Park

Cycle Greater Yellowstone: Day 5 hitching to Cody

Cycle Greater Yellowstone: Day 6 out-and-back from Cody

Cycle Greater Yellowstone: Day 7 ride to Red Lodge
Copyright 2013 by Katie Bradshaw